Meta-Pile #6 Cleaning the Plate, 13 Weeks at a Time

17 Jun

Of late, I have found myself  bogged down among a plethora of books from two separate libraries, as well as volumes from my personal collections, while simultaneously pulled in 5 or 6 directions intellectually speaking (on top of  the rest of my life happenings). This has been the result of  half-hearted intentions on my part to prepare for  further graduate work in history, humanities, and philosophy.  Needless to say, this has even negatively affected my output of reviews: attempt too many tasks and nothing gets done.

10 June 2014

So I have decided to make a “clean sweep”, return all (or at least the very, vast majority) and start anew with 6 books filling the role of text-books to provide background exposure to the courses of instruction I desire to take. From there I shall proceed to actively read only 6 volumes at any one time from all combinations of sources: personal public, college, or private library collections, giving me 6 days of active reading and one day of rest.

17 June 2014

Yeah, okay that idea died an ignominious death. I did, however take the step of returning all my borrowed volumes from Berry College. I still plan to ultimately reduce my reading loads to 5 books a week at a time, one volume per anticipated blog (with allowances for this blog, which may require more volumes and produce more reviews, once I’ve built up enough entries to make regular posting worthwhile.

The Thirteen Week Reading Diet

In the meantime, I still plan to continue  my background reading toward the various M.A. degrees I am seeking, only this time I will give myself deadlines. I also  have a definite format in mind, based on the syllabi for the courses in the programs, with which to direct my reading, note-taking, and responses to the material (this is my way of making myself accountable to myself, by announcing what I am doing, that way people can bug me about my progress). The programs I plan to pursue maintain a 13 week course schedule; so to acclimatize myself to the reading and writing workload that these degrees entail I shall take a text or texts on a subject (for instance Mortimer J Adler’s How to Read a Book, or Will (and Ariel) Durant’s 14vol Story of Civilization), and spend  (up to) 13 weeks reading them.  For each week of reading, I will produce a review for the book, or  in some cases the section of book, I’m reading, and a final summary of my reading at the end of the 13 week cycle; only then will I  move on to the next assignment.

I will title each review “Select Reading Program” to keep track of my progress. (Incidentally, this process is also a good way to work my way through the ginormous backlog of reading material I have accumulated over the years.)


 

To give you a hint of how many directions my fertile mind has been stretched into, the following six areas have the most volumes within my personal library, and form the core of my intellectual pursuits. In fact, with the exception of Japanese Studies, I have found that all these areas comprise sections in a larger endeavor conceived of as a ‘natural history of the soul’ that engages philosophy, theology and science.

Biology and Chemistry

Humanities and Classics

Japanese Studies/Anime

Jewish Studies

Patristic Studies

Philosophy – Epistemology / Metaphysics / Ethics / Political Philosophy / Philosophy of Science (Biology)


 

Select Reading Plan, The Texts:

The books listed below represent the choice of books for my first four ‘courses’ of reading, what I have termed my “Select Reading Plan

1) Humanities

How to Read a Book : The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading Rev. and updated ed. / Mortimer J. Adler, and Charles Van Doren. New York: Simon and Schuster 1940. [1972].  xiii, 426 p. Includes Bibliographic References and Index.

The Story of Civilization  / Will Durrant. NY: MJF Books. 1935. 1963. 14v.  v1 Our Oriental Heritage

History of Philosophy 9v. / Frederick Copleston.

2) Theology/Patristics/Jewish Studies

Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. 10v / Gerhard Kittel, editor. Geoffrey W Bromiley, translator. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.  1964.  [v1 Alpha - Gamma] [Fifth Printing 1972]

3) Anime/Japanese Studies

Culture Shock! Japan [third edition] / Rex Shelley. Portland, OR: Graphics Arts Center Publishing Company. 1993. 2000. 280 p. ; ill. Includes Bibliographic References and Index.

 The Electric Geisha: Exploring Japan’s Popular Culture / Atsushi Ueda, ed. translated by Miriam Eguchi.  Tokyo:  Kodansha International. 1994.  260p.  Includes Glossary

The World of the Shining Prince : Court Life in Ancient Japan / Ivan Morris.   New York:  Vintage. 1964. Introduction copyright 1994.  xxvii,  336p. Includes Bibliographic References and Index.

A Reader’s Guide to Japanese Literature  [2d ed] / J. Thomas Rimer. Tokyo: Kodansha International. 1999.  244p. Includes Bibliographic References and Index.

4) Science

Biology:  [bibliographic citation not yet available] *

Chemistry: [bibliographic citation not yet available] *

a variety of used college-level textbooks acquired from *cough* Goodwill Stores, as well as popular science magazines provide the basis for my background science readings


 

For simplicity, I’ll update this post with my current status each week

Week One:  June 22-June 28 2014

Meta-Pile #5 The Gentle Art of Reviewing: The Five Forms

17 Jun

As part of my ongoing quest to perfect my reviewing style, expand my knowledge base, and make better analyses of what I read, thus improving the reviews I offer, (the perfect excuse to spend mindless hours browsing and searching Wikipedia, naturally,I have tried to identify just what it is I am doing when I craft a book review. To my surprise, I learned that book reviews are considered to be a form of literary criticism.

Oddly enough, it’s hard for me to think about myself engaging in literary criticism when I’m only writing  book reviews (especially when most of them are non-fiction), because for me  literary criticism involves  the production of articles of 10-30 pages or longer monographs that evaluate the literary quality of an author’s work, and I have no formal training in literature,  but that is exactly what I am doing. In researching styles and templates for reviewing books, I  have had cause to look back to my student days, and  the instructions from my undergraduate professors on critiques we wrote on assigned reading, and realized that I preferred writing reviews that looked like that, but then I wondered,  is a ‘critique’ the same as a ‘review? And what about those pesky terms “bibliographic essay” and “literature review?” How do they fit into the equation, And then,  to complicate matters further,  I like to read Publishers Weekly, The Times Literary Supplement, The New York Times Book Review, The New York Review of Books, Books & Culture, the book review sections of academic periodicals, and even user-generated reviews on Amazon and GoodReads.com, so you could say that I like formal book reviews over informal assessments.

In all I have come to identify five forms of book evaluations, some which consider only the “book-in-hand”, some which cover multiple books:  Book Review, Book Critique, Annotated Bibliographies, Bibliographic Essays and Literature Reviews,  all of them forms of directed literary criticism -even when the source material is non-fiction. To keep them straight in my mind, as well as to help you, the gentle reader, I decided to  air out my findings and so I present to you the Five Forms of Book Reviews:

  1. Book Review.  A book review gives an evaluation of a book (text or audio) that either provides a recommendation for or against reading it, (which seems silly to my mind, because simply hearing about a work is not the same as reading -or seeing, or hearing- the work for yourself), or that provides a (hopefully reasoned) judgement about the story or argument.  These can be academic and journal reviews, personal reviews, paid reviews, volunteer reviews, and professional reviews  According to Wikipedia, a book review is a “form of literary criticism in which a book is analyzed based on content, style, and merit. … Reviewers, in literary periodicals, often use the occasion of a book review for a display of learning or to promulgate their own ideas on the topic of a fiction or non-fiction work” (1) and notes that often, evaluations are based on personal taste, which translate into only those books get reviewed that a reader really likes or really hates. The majority of people, however understand, and use a book review as a way to respond to the experience of reading, and don’t always provide convincing reasons for this response, so instead of a reasoned opinion on an author or a boo, it becomes a statement of personal taste and we all know the maxim about taste: De gustibus, non est disputandum.
  2. Book Critique  A critique of a work covers more than just the bare bones of plot, theme, style.  It considers the author’s credentials (and thus his expertise or authority in writing), the strengths and weaknesses of the argument, as well as engaging with other reviews of the work to give a more balanced view. A proper critique should also provide some context about the work: when, where, and why it was written, and how -if at all- it should affect our judgement of the work. In some of the more august reviewing literature,  critiques and reviews blend together, but I like to make a distinction. I suppose this means my ‘reviews’ are actually critiques, but since ‘review’ is a little less pretentious-sounding than ‘critique’, I’ll stay with ‘review’ to describe my evaluations.
  3. Annotated Bibliography :  Annotated Bibliographies are perhaps the ‘easiest’ or simplest form of literary criticism that covers multiple titles. It’s really a listing of books, together with a one or two sentence description of its contents, or recommendation about it’s use. These are usually topically and/or chronologically oriented, and find a home within public libraries, undergraduate libraries, or even museums.
  4. Bibliographic Essay :  Bibliographic essays are usually stand alone works that include comments and evaluations of multiple works either by the same author, or on the same topic.  I will use them in two other ways:   to review an author’s entire corpus, or a majority portion thereof; or to provide readers wit a generalized reading plan on a topic of interest.
  5. Literature Review:  Literature Reviews cover the current state of research (or scholarship) on a problem of scientific or humanistic note, or within a particular  academic discipline.  They are designed to be more impartial than a bibliographic essay, and are usually found within a larger research context, such as scientific research papers, a master’s thesis or  doctoral dissertations.

These five forms make up the expected literary and intellectual content  of Piles and Philes, and to a lesser extent my other forthcoming blogs.

 


Sources:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Review  Accessed on 9 June 2014

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critique  Accessed on 9 June 2014

Mini-Pile #6 on Neil Shubin’s Fish and Rocks

26 Feb

This post is an anomaly, in that it features two books, albeit by the same author in the same post.

Your Inner Fish: a journey into the 3.5 billion-year history of the human body / Neil Shubin. NY: Pantheon Books. 2008. ix, 229p ill. : Includes Bibliographic References and Index.

and

The Universe Within: discovering the common history of rocks, planets, and people / Neil Shubin. NY: Pantheon Books. 2013. x, 213p ill. : Includes Bibliographic References and Index.

This pair of books, published five years apart by Neil Shubin, associate dean at the University of Chicago, paleontologist who specializes in the evolution of fish (paleoichthyology),  and a lecturer in human anatomy for the medical school makes a combined argument about the shared history of the human body -it’s  organs, tissues, and molecules- not just with all over animal life, but indeed stretching to encompass the planet, sun, solar system.

As  works of general science (biology, evolutionary biology, paleontology, geology, astronomy) they provide tantalizing hints and explanations for the existence and origins of our bodies relatively free of bio-technobabble  in a compact package.  Easily readable by anyone in High School. He places notes, references, and suggestions for further reading together at the back for each volume, and sprinkles photographs, figures, and charts throughout the text.

Definitely not a primary source for research (or even a proper secondary source for anything beyond a undergraduate introductory course in Biology), Shubin nonetheless shows himself to be a good and patient teacher. He fills the page with personal examples from his own fossil-collecting expeditions, as well as the results of research from other scientists to make his points.

I feel almost foolish for adding this, but the books are accessible even for those who reject the notion of  evolution as an unguided,  non-directional  and non-progressive, natural (and sexual) selection process that just happens to have budded a self-conscious twig from the vast tree of life, and prefer or accept instead either a 6-Day Creation (with or without a young earth component) or the notion of  evolution as a guided process by intelligent design as providing the best explanation of our origins, and who are at least willing to read arguments in opposition so they will have an educated appreciation of the same.

A more detailed summation and critique for each separate volume will (eventually) reside at The Strange Affair of the Evolutionary Creationist blog

Mini-Pile #5 “Igniting the Reaches” by David Drake

24 Feb

Igniting the reaches / David Drake. New York:  Ace Books. 1994. 262 p.

Igniting the Reaches is the initial volume in a short (three volume) series about buccaneer style trade and diplomacy at the point of a sword (or in this case the laser rifle-barrel), set in the far future after the “Collapse” -the sudden decline and fall of the last great human empire a thousand years before the story opens.  The story follows the mercantile exploits of two men from the planet Venus: Piet Ricimer a young deep-space sailor and Stephen Gregg, scion of a merchant family, in their attempt to restore  Venus and Venerian trade to the stars  while making their fortunes. They  do this in a small spacecraft  named “Peaches”  with a ragtag crew that even includes a genetically-engineered former alien slave.  The book  ends up being a set of conflicts between the Venerians and the other two primary human political entities: the  Earth based North American Federation and the Southern Cross, along with other independent traders/privateers or “pirates” (depending on your point of view).

Drake is good at writing combat, but I found it hard to get excited by either the characters, or the plot -even knowing  it’s historical basis in the writings and exploits of  Sir Francis Drake, Sir Walter Raleigh and Richard Hakluyt in the Age of Discovery as explained by the author.  In fact, I nearly had to drag myself to finish the book.  It doesn’t flow as smoothly as the RCN series (Daniel Leary and Adele Mundy), nor does it have the punch of “Hammer’s Slammers”, or the character engagement of the Belisarius series (I can’t speak to how it compares to his fantasy works such as “Lord of the Isles” as I haven’t read any of them yet). My other ‘plaint, as the Publishers Weekly review (1994, as excerpted on Amazon.com) points out, is the characters’  lack of concern for, and even a moral disengagement about, the consequences of their actions other than  those that lead to the success of their own mission: they take it for granted that life should be this way. This though seems par for the course for Drake’s characters and is not unique to the “Reaches” series.

This last bit, though is partially explained by Drake himself:  in an author’s afterward, he gives a philosophical justification for his writing style and treatment of characters. Commenting that the truth that each person holds in his head is unique to that person and “can’t really be expressed to anyone else,” he yet tries to write his fiction from the standpoint of  this truth, and admits: “One of the ways I achieve that end is to use historical events as the paradigm for my fiction”.  For the “Reaches” series  this involves reading of the exploits of  the 16th and 17th century explorers and  the writings of Richard Hakluyt, and projecting these real life events into a far future setting.

I can’t bring myself to recommend this book to anyone. At the same time, I wouldn’t say don’t read it; that is to say Igniting the Reaches failed to ignite my interest in the characters and not a story I would read again, so becoming one of the “Indifferent” books that will inevitably litter the posts of my blog.

Pile #15 “Doors of Perception: Icons and Their Spiritual Significance” by John Baggley

30 Jan

Doors of Perception: Icons and their spiritual significance / John Baggley. Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press. 1988.  xi, 160p. Includes Bibliographic References and Index.

Worship with the Senses

We Christians of the 20th and 21st century live in a highly visual culture – while relying for the most part on oral and written testimony to learn of, and know God in Jesus Christ mostly through proclamation.  And yet, Christian Faith and Worship is a more than merely verbal and mental, it is a sensual experience: utilizing sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell; through these God-given senses we bring all of ourselves as an offering to the Lord each Sunday when we gather, and ideally in our daily lives when we turn to the Lord in prayer and thanksgiving.

Of all the senses the one most honed throughout most of human history is that of sight (which means it is also the sense most easily debased) To aid this understanding and appropriation of the Spirit, a long and rich tradition of Christian art exists, one that has not always remained in chancel or chapter house. The down side to this is that Western religious art, like academic, scholarly study of the Scriptures has often become divorced from the Faith and Church that such studies and practice were meant to serve.

To See or Not to See, That is the Question…

And yet our contemporary (western) liturgical and devotional forms are in a sense vestiges of a much richer approach to worship  that relies less on a realism so prominent in our Western Christian art and theology, than on expressing the inner spirit in visible form. This alternative to artistic realism is found most readily in the Orthodox (and Coptic) East, and in their primary expression of religious art -the Icon.

Icons are an integral aspect of corporate worship and devotion of the Eastern Church, bringing the Communion of Saints to mind in a highly visible format, as well as teaching the faith without words. They are also a legacy of faith from the undivided Church. My own parish, Our Saviour is privileged to possess no less than three Icons  from different liturgical backgrounds and styles within the Church grounds:  two in the Lady Chapel after the Byzantine fashion and an Ethiopian Icon that hangs in the parish hall.

Sadly, though, they are not often utilized for their proper devotional function. This may have something to do with our lack of understanding of the force, and influence of Icons. Many books exist that introduce Icons for a Western Christian, but most are written for an Eastern audience by Eastern writers, and don’t always address Western concerns. Happily, the parish library once again comes to the rescue, for its shelves hold  the Doors of Perception: Icons and their Spiritual Significance by Fr. John Baggley.

Opening the Doors…

Doors of Perception is a book on Icons written for a Western audience by a Anglican priest (at the time of writing, Fr. Baggley was serving as Team Rector of the Bicester Team of Parishes in Oxfordshire) who is a sympathetic outside observer of Orthodoxy, and published by a venerable American Orthodox publishing house to introduce the discipline, decorum, and devotion of iconodulia -the veneration of holy Icons. It explores the history, theology, and spirituality of Icons for the Western audience, without taking prior experience or knowledge of Orthodoxy or Icons for granted.

Fr. Baggley offers 8 Chapters, an essay on the painting of icons by Richard Temple, a section of color plates with meditations, and two appendixes.  The first 98 pages of text covers the general historical and theological introduction, as well as  the spiritual tradition that surrounds Icons.  The second part, pages 99-105, consists of an essay by Richard Temple of The Temple Gallery, London (which is a centre for the “study, restoration, and exhibition of Icons”, specializing in Russian Icons) about the nature and techniques of Icon painting, and the third section is a collection of 18 Icon plates with provenance  and commentary and meditation.

After the introductory chapter, two chapters deal with a historical overview of the use of Icons, two chapters cover biblical language and imagery, and as well as it’s interpretation, and two chapters cover the Orthodox spirituality (especially the monastic setting) that forms the background for Icon painters (actually most of the book is a primer on Orthodox spirituality as the making, and use of Icons owes so much to this spiritual theology), and the last chapter situates the Icons in their liturgical and devotional context.

For Beginners, and Well-Seasoned Travelers

Fr Baggley does not presume that we know anything about Icons, other than the fact that they are a style of Eastern liturgical and devotional art (if indeed we know that much), so shies away from lots of technical jargon, unless the terms are first explained.

Having myself read a number of earlier books on Icons (including the two volume Theology of the Icon by the late Léonide Ouspensky -my first fora into Icons) I wasn’t expecting to learn many new things about Icons and their use but, found myself pleasantly surprised at the depth of information, as well as the integration of theology and spiritual aesthetics which Fr. Baggley and Mr. Temple offer. I can honestly say that this book has done much to increase my love of the Icon.


 

The next complete Pile  (#16) I am preparing is Dr. Jaroslav Pelikan’s Mary Through the Centuries, which marks a milestone of sorts for me, as it marks the last Amazon Book Review that I submitted way back when I was consumed with climbing the ranks of Amazon reviewers -said fervour has since died down somewhat. I mentioned in a previous Pile that I thought it best to savor Mary Through the Centuries only when placed alongside it’s predecessor, Jesus Through the Centuries: His Place in the  History of Culture. I have since rethought that position, not least because I have read so many other books in the meantime without returning to Jesus Through the Centuries and now think it best to actually finish the review, so  along with my Select Reading Project of Foreground Reading for additional university degrees, I am putting the finishing touches on Mary. Until then my friends, keep reading, learning, and loving.

Pile #14 “The Great Hunt” by Robert Jordan

22 Jul

The Great hunt / Robert Jordan.  NY:  Tor Books.  1990.   598 p.

So, what do you do, having left your village fleeing from minions of the Dark One, seen the world, entered the Blight  to find the Eye of the World and the Green Man, defeated two of the Forsaken, battled Ba’alzamon and uncovered the legendary Horn of Valere, not to mention one of the Seals of the Dark One’s prison and the infamous Dragon Banner of Lews Therin Telamon. Oh, and discovered you can channel, which might make you the Dragon Reborn? Why, return to Shiernar and cool your heels of course while waiting for more directions from your friendly Aes Sedai and basking in your new-found power and glory.

Or not.

Second Verse, not like the First

This, the second book in the “The Wheel of Time” opens with a prologue detailing a gathering of Darkfriends sworn to the Dark Lord from among all the nations and organizations in the world, where they are given certain tasks to perform to prepare for the Dark Lord’s coming, tasks which do not immediately come to fruition.  As the book proper opens, Rand and company are still in Shienar, and wondering what is going to happen next..All Rand wants is to be normal, to escape from a net he sees increasingly being thrown upon him. But for Rand, of course, there is no going back, as he is no longer ‘just’ a sheepherder, as the next 50 chapters, demonstrate.

Upon his return to Shiernar, he finds himself being treated as a lord in his own right by the Shiernarians, no matter how hard he protests. Then the Amyrlin Seat (the leader of the Aes Sedai) comes to Fal Dara, and a dangerous Darkfriend -and more than Darkfriend- escapes, taking with him the Horn of Valere so recently found again, and -more importantly to Rand and his companions- a dagger from the dead city Shadar Logoth that is tied to Mat, that sends Rand, Mat, and Perrin along with a troop of Shienarians all the way to Toman Head at the opposite end of the continent in pursuit, only to find themselves caught up in a large battle between new and old foes -but not before Rand, Loial and a thief-catcher named Hurin are temporarily separated from the group when Rand inadvertently channels.

In the meantime, Egewen and Nynaeve finally enter the White Tower to begin their training, only to quickly find themselves betrayed and worse -with the training interrupted they are whisked away to the city of Falme (which just happens to be on Toman Head, incidentally), where Egewen is enslaved, by a people calling themselves the Seanchan.

Along the way, we are treated to the machinations of the Children of Light (th Whitecloaks), the arrival of the aforementioned Seanchan -descendants of the armies Artur Hawkwing sent over the Aryth Ocean- and introduced to the workings and factions within Tar Valon itself, not even considering glimpses of secondary characters such as Thom Merrilon and Domon Bayle.

Quest Within a Quest

This second installment of the Wheel of Time for the most part is a straightforward quest for the stolen Horn of Valere, and for Mat’s dagger -without which he will die. And yet, it is a trial for Rand, knowing who he is, and what must happen to him -what happens to any man who can channel, and more, as he is the Dragon Reborn. He wants to find the dagger so Mat can live, and then depart so he won’t hurt anyone he loves and cares for, yet he never seems able to disentangle himself when the time comes.  At the same time though, other themes are introduced and set up for the future: the manuverings of the Children of the Light, the Hailene of the Seanchan, Padan Fain and his desire for revenge against Rand, Perrin’s developing wolfsense, even the “wheels within wheels” maneuverings of the various political factions known as Daes Dae’mar -the Game of Houses (or Great Game), if you pardon the pun.

The story begins splitting like tree branches, or maybe tree-roots is a better analogy, since time and time again the smaller stories merge into one another, entangling the plot, only to diverge a few chapters further on. The first time is after the Horn is stolen, and Rand joins the search for it while Egwene and Nynaeve go to the White Tower, Another split occurs when Rand and a small party get separated from the main group, and then again, when Egwene and Nynaeve are whisked away from the Tower.

One Thing Less

Certainty now takes its place among hope, trust, and love as missing from Jordan’s world, and yet I continue to want more. Everything that Rand thought he knew becomes shaken, Egewen, Elyane and Nynaeve find that what they thought they knew is as nothing compared to what they do not know, and no one is certain what will happen now. There is also a lot of fear built into this world: fear of the Dark One, fear of the Dragon Reborn, fear (and hatred) of Aes Sedai, of Trollocs, Fades, Darkfriends, Aiel, and Whitecloaks.

What I begin to find irritating in Jordan’s work over and over again is an unbalanced worldview in the relation between Good and Evil. While the Dark One -even from his prison- can touch the world and influence the course of events through dreams, and run amuk with his minions, the “Creator” -who sealed him in Shauyul Ghul at the moment of Creation -we are never told why, or where the Dark One came from- is a completely hands-off deity with no apparent concern for what happens in the world that He has created. People claim to be dedicated to the “Light” -that everyone uses as a prayer and a curse- as opposed to the Dark One,  but no one looks to the Light for help against the Shadow.

Another weave is introduced into the Pattern though, the mysterious military force known as the Seanchan, representing the Hailene, meaning in the Old Tongue, “Those Who Come Beforethat is preparing for a Corene, a “Return”

Whatever Happened to Who says Character Development is Dead?

Some reviewers criticize Jordan for backsliding the characters in this second book.  After everything they went through in The Eye of the World, the theory goes, surely they would have learned something about what is to be expected of them, and they would mature, grow into the responsibility that has been thrust upon them. Except, in reality, this is not always the case; not everybody learns from their experiences .

Keep in mind: Rand, Mat, Perrin, Egwin, and Nynave are from The Two Rivers, an isolated, provincial, hill-billy type world, with no training or prior experience to prepare them for their tasks in a much wider world, their much flouted stubbornness aside. Even after what they experienced, they still find it hard to accept -much less adapt to- what is happening to them (well the boys at least). Additionally, the boys are struggling with the notion of being ta’veren, of being caught up in something they did not ask for, and for Rand, especially, knowing what is expected of him as Dragon Reborn, -not to mention the madness he is heir to as a man who can channel- an additional burden not shared by the women.

So, you want to just jump right in, do ya?

Caveat: this volume is a continuation of The Wheel of Time series, and not appropriate for the reader who is not already familiar with the series. Prospective readers are invited and expected to read the precursor volume(s) starting with “The Eye of the world” to understand the timing.  Some other [Amazon, but also personal acquaintances of this reviewer] reviewers complain that Jordan does not make his volumes stand alone. The statement is true on it’s surface, but the interpretive slant placed on it by the reviewer does not follow i.e. that each volume should neatly wrap up the events that began  on page one.

Unlike a television soap opera (to which TWOT has also been unfavorably compared to) or lighthearted sitcom, you cannot just ‘pick up’ a volume of Jordan and expect to understand  the whole storyline at a glance; each volume is part of a larger tapestry, and I for one, appreciate this aspect, just as I appreciate the ‘real-time’ nature of the protagonists’ development as characters and as (fictitious) persons.

At the same time, readers who first pick up volume 2 (or even  Volume 3) can still enjoy an understanding of what the stakes are, even if the minutiae escape them, just like a person can read a history of WW2 without necessarily having the background of the events of WW1 and the Paris Peace Conference of 1919.

The Wheel of Time Sequence:

The Eye of the World
The Great Hunt

Coming up next is  a review of  Doors of Perception by John Baggley, introducing history, theology, and practice of Icons to a Western audience. So until then my friends, stay calm and keep reading!

Pile #13 “Yeshua: A Guide to the Real Jesus and the Original Church” by Ron Moseley

7 May

Yeshua: A guide to the real Jesus and the original church / Ron Mosley. Clarkesville, MD: Lederer Books,  1996. Includes Bibliographic References and Index.  [Kindle edition]

nota bene: This marks the end of my reviews that I adapted from my prior published material on Amazon.com (with one exception, to be noted below). Going forward, my reviews will be original creations, except for those reviews that might be adapted from The Angelus,  the parish newsletter for  Church of Our Saviour, Atlanta  This means that my pace, already slowing down since the end of February, will be a tad bit slower, as I actually have to write them all out as opposed to simply reworking existing material (Oh the horror!!, Oh the humanity!!)At the same time, I do have a considerable backlog of reviews to push out, so I definitely will not run out of material any time soon. (Especially as I continually purchase books from Amazon….around 30 at last count over the last 6 months), and I’m sure to continue to enjoy a lot of overlap between this blog, Amazon reviews, and those aforementioned other blogs that I have not as yet been able to work up as planned.

And now, let us together explore the real (life and meaning of) Yeshua and His meaning for us latter day believers in His Name.   The original review can be found here http://www.amazon.com/review/R4FCZET43W3B3/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm

Remembering the Jewish Jesus

In recent years it has become fashionable to remember that before He was hailed as the Christ -the Messiah of Israel- Jesus of Nazareth was born, raised, lived, and even died, as a Jew, and that the first communities to spread His message were sent from the synagogues to the synagogues and almost as an afterthought to God-fearing Gentiles. Such lights and critical scholars as +N.T. Wright, R. Shmuley Boteach, Marcus Borg, John Dominic Crossan, Geza Vermes, and Dr. Bart Ehrman have given us volumes of ‘biographies’ and studies focusing on Jesus as a Jew, and along with this comes a thawing of how Christians view both individual Jews and Judaism, both modern and ancient. Before these writers were received into the public imagination, however, there was Dr. Ron Moseley, and his book Yeshua: a Guide to the Real Jesus and the Original Church.

Dr. Moseley has multiple doctorates in such fields as Second Temple History, and Religion and Society, as well as a D.LL. in Research, and studied at Princeton, University of Texas, and Oxford Graduate School at Oxford University, and currently resides in Jerusalem, Israel.

The book is comprised of a Foreword, Preface, and Introduction, 9 chapters with a Conclusion, a section of Notes, a Glossary and Bibliography. Additionally,  each chapter ends with a set of Study Questions for individual or group use.

Dr. Moseley’s aims in the book are to show that: Yeshua (Jesus’s name as transliterated from the Hebrew) lived a fully Jewish life, that the earliest Church was Jewish and organized along synagogal lines; that major Jewish concepts (especially “Torah”) are misunderstood when communicated in a Greek language and idiomatic mindset; that the Pharisees were the orthodox fundamentalists of their day and had both heroes and villains in their ranks; and that the earliest Church was but one of many sects within first century Judaism -all wrapped around the overriding premise “that it is impossible to understand the first 100 years of the Church’s existence without a knowledge of the Hebrew culture from which it sprang” (from the preface). It defines for the reader the “players, struggles, and issues” which affected the earliest Church, as well as the environment that Jesus was raised in, the people that He loved, and the religion that He served.

Dr. Moseley opens his book with the following statement regarding standard works of church history at the time of writing: “By beginning their research with the later second and third-century Church after it had become predominantly a Gentile organization, they have lost the history of the first hundred years.” This awareness is shown in the favorable foreword written by Professor Marvin Wilson of Gordon College “If one desires to be radically Christian, a thorough understanding of the Jewish origin of the Church is by no means optional; it is foundational.”

The Misunderstood Pharisees

The greatest part of the book is given over to a study of the Pharisees (the “Perushim”), perhaps the most misunderstood group of Jews to Christian eyes: their rise and function within Jewish society, their teachings and their enduring influence and eventual morphing into the rabbinate of post-Second Temple Judaism, and this can be seen by a glance at the table of contents. The first chapter covers the evidence for the Jewish background of the early Church, the second chapter covers major Jewish idioms and ideas in the teaching of Jesus Himself. The third chapter takes up the Torah/Law and the misconceptions that arise from its transmission in a Greek-mindset using the Greek language as opposed to the Hebrew mindset and language. Chapters 4 and 5 are a discussion of the relation of the Old and New Testaments and the influence of the Old on the New, and last 4 chapters are taken up with the Pharisees.

Meant Not For the Scholars

Some [Amazon] reviewers have criticized Dr. Moseley for quoting lavishly from other scholarship without providing his own arguments for his thesis. This book, though, does not pretend to be a work of original scholarship that uncovers previously unknown information about the life of of Jesus, or a textbook on the same. In fact it’s purpose is just the opposite of the criticism.

It is a general purpose reader that seeks to call attention to the actual Jewishness of Jesus and the earliest Church, bringing together information from various sources, and written on a level that is approachable to readers of a general education, a Sunday School or church group, not a specialist audience of scholars. So of necessity he relies on the published work of other authors and scholars. Any one of his aims could be (and in fact is) the subject of a book by itself. Additionally, as has been subsequently brought out by the author, this book came out at a time when there was little other literature out there proclaiming and celebrating the Jewishness of Jesus and the early Church.

While not a weakness, I would have preferred a more scholarly presentation of the subject, yet I believe it is quite adequate for someone who doesn’t care for lots of footnotes, non-English quotations, abbreviations or bibliographies interrupting their reading but who does want to learn something about the world that Jesus and the Church was born into. Another nit-pick from my perspective is the fact that he quotes mostly from the KJV; though I would have liked to have seen more recent translations, I realize that the KJV is probably the version most English-speaking readers will be familiar with. I would hope that in revised editions of the work, Dr. Moseley would consider alternate translations, such as the NIV, RSV, or ESV.

This book will provide the most benefit to readers who have little to no previous formal exposure to the Judaism of Jesus’ day, and can be used by church youth groups, Sunday Schools, or the casual reader. If nothing else, it should open the eyes of the sympathetic reader to the religious diversity that existed within Judaism in the days of Jesus, and rid him of a simplistic understanding of the faith of Israel.

*This review refers to the Kindle edition of the text, and there were some formatting issues as well as typographical and minor editorial glitches in the text that detracted a little from my enjoyment of the book, but did not alter the argument of the work.                                                                                                                                         

Normally this would be the part of the post where I tell you what to look forward to for my next review, but the truth is, though the ‘scheduled’ review is Mary Through the Centuries: Her Place in the History of Culture by Jaroslav Pelikan is the next one, it’s really a book that is savored best when read alongside it’s companion and predecessor, Jesus Through the Centuries: His Place in the History of Culture, also by Pelikan. So, for now, I’ll be working on adapting some of my previous book reviews written for my parish church newsletter, as well as working on a crop of truly orginal book reviews (including reviews of the next 2 books in The Wheel of Time. Until then my friends, keep calm and read on!

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