Mini-Pile #4 “Seeing Christ in the Old Testament” by Ervin Hershberger

6 Mar

The original review can be found here  Seeing Christ in the Old Testament by Ervin Hershberger http://www.amazon.com/review/R2QW77K1H0ZO4P/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm

The second of two related books, that I did not wish to lump together into a single Pile, no matter the brevity of presentation of each work.

An old Latin couplet says: “The New is in the Old concealed, the Old is in the New Revealed”, and Christians and Christianity from the beginning have always seen Christ as the fulfillment of the Law and Prophets.  Ervin Hershberger, in this his second of two Bible studies is no less enthusiastic about reading the Old Testament with understanding by searching for glimpses of Christ Himself in the Old Testament.

Mr. Hershberger wrote out of the Mennonite Christian tradition, and taught for many years at Calvary Bible School (a Beachy Amish Mennonite affiliated. but non-accredited – i.e. non-degree granting institution) in Arkansas. This book, as well as his earlier”Seeing Christ in the Tabernacle”, was written at the behest of colleagues at the school. The tenor of this book, as with his earlier book is a study aid for a High School level course on the Old Testament.

The New in the Old

Hershberger divided his work into four parts: 1) seeing Christ in the beginning as “eternity past” in Creation, 2) seeing Christ in 13 Names of God  3) in major biblical characters -20 characters from the Old Testament (covered in 14 chapters with 6 chapters covering pairs of characters (Adam and Abel, Abraham and Isaac, two Joshuas, Aaron and Eleazar, David and Solomon, and Elijah and Elisha);  and 4) in “eternity future” -in the fulfillment and culmination of all things.

The chapters on the Names of God can be further divided (though not by the author) into Names revealed before the Exodus, Names revealed during the sojourn in the wilderness, and Names revealed in the Promised Land.

As a work written to lead the Christian believer into a deeper awareness and appreciation of the presence of Christ in the Old Testament, by showing how actions, persons, and Names therein foreshadow the more perfect working of Christ, “Seeing Christ in the Old Testament” is a good pointer, and the reader can derive enjoyment from Hershberger’s simple, heartfelt prose. However, readers are advised to use this, not as their primary study guide for understanding Christ and His messiaship in the Old Testament, but as one more tool to crack open the depths of meaning that the Scriptures has for us.

The book as a whole could have benefited from sections that showed Christ in the Psalms and Christ in the Prophets,

The Loss of Language

One weakness of the work as an aid to critical study of the place of Christ in the Old Testament is his admitted lack of familiarity with the biblical languages which prevents careful exegesis of cited passages, as well as his lack of engagement with other authors or commentaries to describe the the Old Testament’s relation to the New Testament and to the One Faith of Israel.

Although in the preface he is praised for his ability to read Luther’s German Bible, which may occasionally enrich his insights, Hershberger admits in his foreword to having no knowledge of Greek or Hebrew, relying totally on Strong’s and on Young’s Concordances, which limits what he can draw from the text, yet he does not feel this is a major handicap to the work he presents. He also suffers from a few blinders in his acceptance of the accuracy of “Jehova” for the Name of God and the reliability of the KJV generally, yet all the same, the reader is encouraged not to judge the work too harshly, as Hershberger wrote it out of a genuine love of the Lord and a desire to share this love. He also wrote, not for scholars, or even necessarily the college educated, but for those who want to know the Lord and His Word a little more closely, without the fetters of academia.

To Love, not Learn the Scriptures

in the end, this short study (like its companion work “Seeing Christ in the Tabernacle) should be seen as a devotional and personal study aid, rather than a systematic, or scholarly commentary on the presence of Christ in the Old Testament/Tanak, written as a simple aid to faith, not a rigorous study of the same. I myself, will undoubtedly return to it to draw wisdom from its well from time to time as a reminder of things I often forget or overlook, while keeping in mind it’s limited purpose.

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